Sanctions

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MISDEMEANOR PENALTIES

Second-degree misdemeanors are the least serious misdemeanors in Florida, punishable by jail terms of up to 60 days and fines of up to $500.  If lawmakers fail to designate the degree of a misdemeanor, it is automatically a second-degree misdemeanor.  Theft of property valued less than $100 or is an example of a second-degree misdemeanor. (Fla. Stat. §§ 775.082775.083 (2021).)

First-degree misdemeanors are the most serious misdemeanors in Florida, punishable by jail terms of up to one year and fines of up to $1,000. Theft of property valued at $100 or more, but less than $750, is an example of a first-degree misdemeanor. (Fla. Stat. §§ 775.082, 775.083 (2021).)

MISDEMEANOR TIME-LIMITS

For all misdemeanors in Florida, the state must begin criminal prosecution within a set time, called the statute of limitations, after which the defendant can move to dismiss the case.  This time begins when the defendant commits the crime. In Florida, first-degree misdemeanors generally have a two-year statute of limitations and second-degree misdemeanors typically have a one-year limitation. (Fla. Stat. § 775.15 (2021).)

FELONY PENALTIES

Third-degree felonies are the least serious types of felonies in Florida, punishable by up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $5,000. If lawmakers fail to designate the punishment for or degree of a felony, then it automatically is a third-degree felony. In Florida, Grand Theft Auto and Possession of Cocaine are examples of third-degree felonies. (Fla. Stat. §§ 775.082, 775.083 (2021).)

Second-degree felonies can result in a prison term of up to 15 years and a fine of not more than $10,000. (Fla. Stat. §§ 775.082, 775.083 (2021)).  Aggravated Battery with a Deadly weapon is an example of a second-degree felony.  

First-degree felonies are typically punishable by up to 30 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. (Fla. Stat. §§ 775.082, 775.083 (2021)). Robbery with a weapon is an example of a first-degree felony.

Capital and life felonies are the most serious crimes in Florida. Capital felonies are punishable by the death penalty or life in prison without the possibility of parole. First degree murder is an example of a capital felony. Life felonies are punishable by life imprisonment and a fine of up to $15,000.  (Fla. Stat. §§ 775.082, 775.083 (2021)).

Sanctions